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Art & Design

  • Asli Çavuşoğlu, still frame from In Diverse Estimations Little Moscow, 2011. © Asli Çavuşoğlu. Commissioned by Borusan Aş, courtesy of NON, İstanbul

    Aslı Çavuşoğlu: In Diverse Estimations Little Moscow

    Contemporary Art

    November 28, 2014 – April 26, 2015

    Asli Çavuşoğlu, still frame from In Diverse Estimations Little Moscow, 2011. © Asli Çavuşoğlu. Commissioned by Borusan Aş, courtesy of NON, İstanbul

  • Aslı Çavuşoğlu: In Diverse Estimations Little Moscow

    The film In Diverse Estimations Little Moscow (2011), by Turkish artist Aslı Çavuşoğlu, stages a series of fragmented, forgotten, and at times painfully remembered histories from a violent political suppression in the Turkish town of Fatsa in 1979 and 1980. Çavuşoğlu shot the film in Fatsa, enlisting untrained locals as actors, crew members, and information sources. Their presence adds a layer of naïve enthusiasm and increased intensity to the reenactments, as the actors are confronted with events from what are often their own families’ recent histories.

    The film opens as two dogs wander the interior of a dilapidated former factory building that was used by the military as an interrogation and torture facility. Çavuşoğlu edits the series of short, disjointed vignettes that follow into a non-linear narrative that is visually and palpably coherent. Capturing the inconsistencies and mythologies that arise in the gaps between personal and collective memory and written history, she achieves a visually de-historicized estimation of the human experience of remembering events and forming memories.

    Support for the RISD Museum provided in part by a grant from the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts (RISCA), through an appropriation by the Rhode Island General Assembly, a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and private funders.

  • In Diverse Estimations Little Moscow opens as two dogs wander the interior of a dilapidated former factory building that was used by the military as an interrogation and torture facility. A young man hiding amidst trees and brush on the outlying hills of Fatsa anxiously yells into the valley below to signal a comrade. The film continues as a series of short disjointed vignettes, edited into a non-linear narrative that is visually and palpably coherent. Capturing the inconsistencies and mythologies that arise in the gaps of personal and collective memory and written history, Çavuşoğlu achieves a visually dehistoricized estimation of the human experience of remembering events and forming memories.

    Asli Çavuşoğlu lives in Istanbul. Her work in various mediums—film, video, writing, performance, installation, and sculpture—focuses on disrupting and expanding commonly accepted historical narratives and the formation and perpetuation of those narratives.