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20 North Main St (also enter on 224 Benefit Street) Providence, RI 02903

Open today 10 am–5 pm

Art & Design

  • Justin Kimball, _Mohawk Street_, 2012-2016, printed 2017.

    Justin Kimball: Elegy

    Prints, Drawings, and Photographs

    December 22, 2017 – July 8, 2018

    Justin Kimball, Mohawk Street, 2012-2016, printed 2017.

  • Justin Kimball: Elegy

    Between 2012 and 2016, Justin Kimball (American, b. 1961, RISD BFA 1985, Photography) drove through Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia photographing small towns that have lost the industries that once made them prosperous communities. Some images portray the residents, their pride, and their hope for renewal, while other images capture dilapidated structures and empty streets. Kimball was keenly aware that the street names—such as Coal Street, West Frack Street, Oak Street, and Spruce Street—reflect the upward mobility of past times rather than the reality of today. He used them as picture titles without identifying the towns, suggesting these sites could represent many places within the U.S. and prompting us to reflect upon similar challenges in our own state. For every elegy, there is a living audience thinking about the future as much as the past.

    This exhibition acknowledges the generous promised gift of this group of inkjet photographs from the Brandler Family. We are also grateful to the artist and to Joseph Carroll of Joseph Carroll and Sons, Boston, for their generous assistance with the project. RISD Museum is supported by a grant from the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts, through an appropriation by the Rhode Island General Assembly and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and with the generous partnership of the Rhode Island School of Design, its Board of Trustees, and Museum Governors.

  • Between 2012 and 2016, Justin Kimball (American, b. 1961, RISD BFA 1985, Photography) drove through Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia photographing small towns that have lost the industries that once made them prosperous communities. Some images portray the residents, their pride, and their hope for renewal, while other images capture dilapidated structures and empty streets. Kimball was keenly aware that the street names—such as Coal Street, West Frack Street, Liberty Street, and Spruce Street—reflect the industries and upward mobility of past times rather than the reality of today. He used them as picture titles without identifying the towns, suggesting these sites could represent many places within the U.S. and prompting us to reflect upon similar challenges in our own state. For every elegy, there is a living audience thinking about the future as much as the past.

    This exhibition acknowledges the generous promised gift of this group of inkjet photographs from the Brandler Family. We are also grateful to the artist and to Joseph Carroll of Joseph Carroll and Sons, Boston, for their generous assistance with the project.